IACG 2019 – Registration Now Open

We are looking forward to the third iACG/ACG Research Open House, scheduled from July 18-19, 2019. The event will take place in Santa Rosa. Please note that we have a new format for the workshop in order to facilitate and maximize interactions and exchanges among participants. The new format includes talks by keynote speakers, lightning talks, and poster sessions, in addition to music, film, and art exhibitions. We are prioritizing time for participants to talk informally at the poster sessions. Therefore, we are soliciting submissions for posters only at this time. We are looking forward to seeing you in Santa Rosa!

Register or submit an abstract

Wednesday night: Welcome Reception / Arts and Films.

Thursday:
Welcome
Morning Keynote
Lightning Talks (Poster talks)
Poster SessionLunch

Afternoon Keynote
Lightning Talks (Poster talks)
Poster Session

Thursday night : BBQ

Friday:
Morning Keynote
Lightning Talks (Poster talks)
Poster SessionLunch

Afternoon Keynote
Lightning Talks (Poster talks)
Poster Session
Wrap up

Saturday: Field Trips (TBD)

PDF Version

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IACG Open House 2019 UPDATED – Registration Open

UPDATED 10 Dec. 2018: Registration Open! Hope to see you in Santa Rosa!

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ACG research in Science Magazine

Work by long-term ACG researchers Daniel Mennill, Stéphanie Doucet, and their graduate students Katrina Switzer and Lincoln Savi, was recently given a nice write-up in Science magazine.

The study uses 3D-printed robotic models to study mating behavior of the yellow toad Incilius luetkenii (formerly Bufo luetkenii). The sudden appearance of bright yellow males at the start of the wet season is a familiar phenomenon to those who have spent time in Santa Rosa. A 2015 paper with graduate student Nicolas Rehberg-Besler provided evidence that the color change facilitated sex recognition in this species. Video below and more at the link.

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GIS resources

Some MINAE-SINAC GIS resources. I don’t have GIS skills but seems like there are some useful things here, and the map viewer is interesting to browse regardless:

Map viewer (click this button to overlay different GIS layers)

CENIGA homepage

SINIA homepage

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Talk on Santa Rosa Super Site – Monday July 24

If you are in or around Santa Rosa on Monday July 24th, professor Arturo Sanchez of the University of Alberta will be giving a talk on his long-term environmental monitoring research in Santa Rosa.

The talk will be in the Centro at 11AM.

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Guide to dry forest reptiles and amphibians in pdf

Toads from norman's here guideLongtime researcher and friend of the ACG David Norman has released a guide to the reptiles and amphibians of Palo Verde and Santa Rosa. The guide consists of 23 color plates and all information is presented in both English and Spanish.

David’s first book on reptiles and amphibians of dry forest was my first field guide to tropical herps and I used it to pieces (literally). I hope that a new generation of dry forest naturalists enjoys this version as much as I did that one.

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Looking forward – Costa Rica’s “Canal Seco”

For those who aren’t aware of this looming challenge, I include a few (not intended comprehensive, just things I have run across in the last year) links below regarding the planned “Canal Seco.” This is an overland cargo route that would run from Limon to Cuajiniquil. Something to keep an eye on.

Panamanian newspaper

Claims that there will be no impact on protected areas

ACG response in press late last year

Official ACG position and supporting maps

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Amanda Melin named Canada Research Chair

Amanda with some heavy duty field gearACG researcher Amanda Melin has been named a Canada Research Chair in Primate Genomics and Dietary Ecology, one of 56 such chairs in Canada.

Much of the work sponsored by the chair will be carried out in Sector Santa Rosa of the ACG, where Dr. Melin is a long time researcher and co-director of the long-running white-faced capuchin research project. Dr. Melin’s work in Santa Rosa has focused on sensory ecology, including the consequences of primate color vision syndromes for foraging behavior.

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High Honors for ACG researcher Linda Fedigan

photo via Amanda Melin @AMelinLab

Dr. Linda Fedigan at the Investiture Ceremony for the Order of Canada, 14 February 2017


A belated congratulations to long-time ACG researcher Linda Fedigan who was inducted into the Order of Canada in June of 2016.

Dr. Fedigan’s research into the white-faced capuchin monkey (Cebus capucinus) is one of the ACG’s longest running and most productive field research projects, and she has supervised dozens of students who have conducted their research in and around Santa Rosa. Her citation reads:

Linda Marie Fedigan has made enduring contributions to the study of primates, some of our closest evolutionary relatives. Canada Research Chair in Primatology and Bioanthropology at the University of Calgary, she established a world-class research station in Costa Rica’s Àrea de Conservación Guanacaste. Known for her field work, she has conducted groundbreaking long-term studies of the life history and reproductive patterns of female monkeys, which have increased our understanding of how primates adapt to their environments. An exemplary mentor, she is also known for her academic study of the role of women in science.

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Hurricane Otto Followup

ACG bomberos distributing food and water
According to IACG’s informants, the ACG seems to have escaped Hurricane Otto relatively unscathed. Roger Blanco writes:

There really wasn’t any impact on ACG infrastructure, with the exception of some trees fallen across different roads and trails. We have been cleaning those up the last few days. Our major wok has been to support the local emergency committees with ACG staff and drivers helping to move people around, distribute water and food, help make inspections and generally reach out to the most affected communities.

Those of you plugged in to the ACG on social media will have seen many great examples of this work over the last few days as the ACG staff (as well as staff from throughout SINAC) have played a major role in the national response to this crisis.

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